Exploding wire plasma energy device and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator; with 7.5 kV output and over 200 capacitors: homemade construction

It’s all over in a flash…

By Dorian Stonehouse

About the author:

The author is an experienced ex television and video engineer and has been involved in electronics since childhood.

Therefore, no attempt should be made by any inexperienced person to construct the device featured in his story. 

Please read it, as it is meant to be read – as a story.

THE transformative capacity of a simple 3 volt lithium ion battery and energy transference – explained in a nutshell:

 plasma device complete in a toolbox

Exploding wire plasma energy device and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator; with 7.5 kV output and over 200 capacitors:

homemade construction

The humble one diode bug zapper – simply transformed

Initially, I purchased 8 fly zapper rackets – the single diode types.

I discarded all the diodes, capacitors and 10 Meg bleed resistors that came with the zappers.

On the low voltage end, I replaced all oscillator transistors with 2sd1616 transistors, thereby improving overall performance.

The diode stack

The upgraded diodes were type RGP02-20E (2000 volt at 0.5amp), and capacitors –  0.470 μF.

The bug zapper output then rose 1.2kV to over 2kV!

The arrangement is very simple, as can be seen ⇓⇓.

oscillators leading to stacks of diodes

Exploding wire plasma energy device and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator; with 7.5 kV output and over 200 capacitors:

homemade construction

Keep yer powder dry

The gaps between the copper tracks at the output of the high voltage transformers are very small.  This could easily have resulted in destructive high voltage arcing and, hence, component destruction.

The remedy was to apply hot glue across all the gaps, thereby shoring up high voltage insulation.

example of one completed module, containing oscillators, diodes and capacitors

Exploding wire plasma energy device and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator; with 7.5 kV output and over 200 capacitors:

homemade construction

 Further the distance…

All plastic box modules have 4 columns, consisting of three diodes in each column.

The diodes are as far away from the transformers as space will allow ⇑⇑.

Important: The whole diode setup must be covered in hot glue – for insulation, or high output voltages will blow your oscillators to smithereens!

The black plastic cover shown⇑⇑ is just split cable sheath. Beneath the sheath is a thick coating of hot glue, leading to the diodes.

One Picture is worth Ten Thousand Words

diodes with long wires leading to four oscillators

To increase the capacitance of the module, hence output, I used 6 x 0.47 μF capacitors per box⇑⇑.

Each capacitor is rated at 1200 volts.

le côté gauche left side of device showing half of main capacitor bank

Looking at the left of the main case⇑⇑, I connected module 1 and 2 high voltage outputs in series; thereby generating about 4kV output from 8 bug zappers.

A closer look at the left bank

closer look at left capacitor bank

Across the two left side modules, I connected groups of 3 capacitors in series, making a total of  102 capacitors.

Each capacitor is 0.47μF, with 51 capacitors in each of the two layers.

An additional 12 capacitors were added to correct for low capacity, giving a total capacity of over 5 μF. 

Always use protection

crowbar protection cable across capacitors

Exploding wire plasma energy device and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator; with 7.5 kV output and over 200 capacitors:

homemade construction

The wire whisker evaporates…

The charged capacitors are connected to the obsolete mains consumer unit switches, located in the top centre of the case (shown later).

The high voltage output is then applied to a very thin wire whisker – two or three cm long (it’s not critical).

I wore heavily tinted goggles and protector earmuffs.

“Three, two, one – fire!”

There was one hell of a flash and a huge bang, followed by blue smoke – success!  

I will try and upload a short video showing the results.

The right must be heard as well…

With another 8 zapper rackets dismantled and the boards treated in exactly the same way as described above, things really started to take off!

A mirror image of the left

The right-hand capacitor bank is of course a mirror image of the left side, minus 12 capacitors, thus making the total value of the left and right banks around 12 μF (222 capacitors).

View from the top

Exploding wire plasma energy device and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator; with 7.5 kV output and over 200 capacitors:

homemade construction

Spike suppressor chokes are connected between all module outputs and the capacitor banks; thereby, suppressing any unwanted spikes being fed back to the oscillators and destroying them!

Old Mains fuse box switches – taken out of retirement!

I used two old mains power switches, each rated at 30 amps, and connected them in series⇑⇑

“View from the top” picture ⇑⇑ shows how I connected the switches to the two capacitor banks.

Size is no guarantee of strength

Exploding wire plasma energy device and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator; with 7.5 kV output and over 200 capacitors:

homemade construction

All oscillator modules are connected in parallel.

They are then connected through a push switch to a 3 volt lithium ion battery⇑⇑.  

Although tiny, the battery is more than adequate to cater for the voltage/current needs of the modules.

 

My trusty steed:

The EMI high voltage power-supply PM28B

The trouble with high voltage measuring probes is that they drift over time, thereby giving false readings.

To align my 30Kv probe, I just turn up the output voltage on my EMI PM28B power-supply to 2Kv, and then adjust the probe potentiometer to read 2 volts on the multi-meter (20 volt scale).

A nice high voltage measuring probe from my (colour!) television workshop of yesteryear

To complete the excercise, I turn up the EMI PM28B  output to 3Kv, and the multi-meter should read 3 volts, thus establishing at least a degree of linearity.

 

To be continued

Highly recommended for you:

https://edgerton.mit.edu/exploding-wire

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3IbAerYj8I

 

Disclaimer

All the projects described in this website are extremely dangerous and relate to the author’s personal experience and are only personal stories. They are not meant to be instructions for anybody to emulate or copy, and none of the authors or anybody else connected with electrosparkles.com can be held responsible should you use the information contained in the website or in any way linked to the website, which may result in any adverse consequences to you and or others.

DORIAN STONEHOUSE